Social Sciences - Elementary Print
Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies
Subchapter A. Elementary

Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, Elementary.


Social Studies, Kindergarten.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Kindergarten, the focus is on the self, home, family, and classroom. The study of our state and national heritage begins with an examination of the celebration of patriotic holidays and the contributions of historical people. The concept of chronology is introduced. Students discuss geographic concepts of location and physical and human characteristics of places. Students are introduced to the basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter and to ways that people meet these needs. Students learn the purpose of rules and the role of authority figures in the home and school. Students learn customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent national beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. Students compare family customs and traditions and describe examples of technology in the home and school. Students acquire information from a variety of oral and visual sources.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales, myths, and legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic values of our state and nation.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands that holidays are celebrations of special events. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the reasons for national patriotic holidays; and

(B) identify customs associated with national patriotic holidays.

(2) History. The student understands how historical figures and ordinary people helped to shape the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the contributions of historical figures. who helped to shape our state and nation; and

(B) identify ordinary people who have shaped the community.

(3) History. The student understands the concept of chronology. The student is expected to:

(A) place events in chronological order; and

(B) use vocabulary related to time and chronology, including before, after, next, first, and last.

(4) Geography. The student understands the concept of location. The student is expected to:

(A) use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location; and

(B) locate places on the school campus and describe their relative locations.

(5) Geography. The student understands the physical and human characteristics of the environment. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the physical characteristics of places such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather; and

(B) identify the human characteristics of places such as types of houses and ways of earning a living.

(6) Economics. The student understands that basic human needs are met in many ways. The student is expected to:

(A) identify basic human needs; and

(B) explain how basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter can be met.

(7) Economics. The student understands the importance of jobs. The student is expected to:

(A) identify jobs in the home, school, and community; and

(B) explain why people have jobs.

(8) Government. The student understands the purpose of rules. The student is expected to:

(A) identify purposes for having rules; and

(B) identify rules that provide order, security, and safety in the home and school.

(9) Government. The student understands the role of authority figures. The student is expected to:

(A) identify authority figures in the home, school, and community; and

(B) explain how authority figures make and enforce rules.

(10) Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent national beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the flags of the nation;

(B) explain the use of voting as a method for group decision making.

(11) Culture. The student understands similarities and differences among people. The student is expected to:

(A) identify personal attributes common to all people such as physical characteristics; and

(B) identify differences among people.

(12) Culture. The student understands how people learn about themselves through family customs and traditions. The student is expected to:

(A) identify family customs and traditions and explain their importance;

(B) compare family customs and traditions; and

(C) describe customs of the local community.

(13) Science, technology, and society. The student understands ways technology is used in the home and school. The student is expected to:

(A) identify examples of technology used in the home and school; and

(B) describe how technology helps accomplish specific tasks.

(14) Science, technology, and society. The student understands ways in which technology has changed how people live. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how his or her life might be different without modern technology; and

(B) list ways in which technology meets people's needs.

(15) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) obtain information about a topic using a variety of oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music;

(B) obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as pictures, symbols, television, maps, computer images, print material, and artifacts;

(C) sequence and categorize information; and

(D) identify main ideas from oral, visual, and print sources.

(16) Social studies skills. The student communicates in oral and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences; and

(B) create and interpret visuals including pictures and maps.

(17) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.3. Social Studies, Grade 1.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 1, students learn about their relationship to the classroom, school, and community. The concepts of time and chronology are developed by distinguishing among past, present, and future events.Students make simple maps to identify the location of places in the classroom, school, and community. The concepts of goods and services and the value of work are introduced. Students identify historic figures and ordinary people who exhibit good citizenship. Students describe the importance of family customs and traditions and identify how technology has changed family life. Students sequence and categorize information.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales, myths, and legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. . Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands how historical figures helped to shape our community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify contributions of historical figures who have influenced the community, state, and nation;

(B) identify historic figures who have exhibited a love of individualism and inventiveness; and

(C) compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures who have influenced the community, state, and nation.

(2) History. The student understands the origins of customs, holidays, and celebrations. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the origins of selected customs, holidays, and celebrations of the community, state, and nation;

(B) compare the observance of holidays and celebrations, past and present;

(3) History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish among past, present, and future;

(B) create a calendar or timeline; and

(C) use vocabulary related to chronology, including yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

(4) Geography. The student understands the relative location of places. The student is expected to:

(A) locate places using the four cardinal directions; and

(B) describe the location of self and objects relative to other locations in the classroom and school.

(5) Geography. The student understands the purpose of maps and globes. The student is expected to:

(A) create and use simple maps to identify the location of places in the classroom, school, community, and beyond; and

(B) locate places of significance on maps and globes such as the local community, and the nation.

(6) Geography. The student understands various physical and human characteristics of the environment. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and describe the physical characteristics of places such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather;

(B) identify examples of and uses for natural resources in the community, state, and nation; and

(C) identify and describe the human characteristics of places such as types of houses and ways of earning a living.

(7) Economics. The student understands the concepts of goods and services. The student is expected to:

(A) identify examples of goods and services in the home, school, and community;

(B) identify ways people exchange goods and services; and

(C) identify the role of markets in the exchange of goods and services.

(8) Economics. The student understands the condition of not being able to have all the goods and services one wants. The student is expected to:

(A) identify examples of people wanting more than they can have;

(B) explain why wanting more than they can have requires that people make choices; and

(C) identify examples of choices families make when buying goods and services.

(9) Economics. The student understands the value of work. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the requirements of various jobs and the characteristics of a job well-performed; and

(B) describe how specialized jobs contribute to the production of goods and services.

(10) Government. The student understands the purpose of rules and laws. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the need for rules and laws in the home, school, and community; and

(B) give examples of rules or laws that establish order, provide security, and manage conflict.

(11) Government. The student understands the role of authority figures and public officials. The student is expected to:

(A) identify leaders in the community, state, and nation;

(B) describe the roles of public officials including mayor, governor, and president; and

(C) identify the responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community.

(12) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary people. The student is expected to:

(A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good;

(B) identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship and exhibit a love of individualism and inventiveness.

(13) Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent national beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:

(A) explain selected national and state patriotic symbols;

(B) use voting as a way of making choices and decisions; and

(C) explain how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an national love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.

(14) Culture. The student understands how families meet basic human needs. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways that families meet basic human needs; and

(B) describe similarities and differences in ways families meet basic human needs.

(15) Culture. The student understands the importance of family beliefs, customs, language, and traditions. The student is expected to:

(A) describe various beliefs, customs, and traditions of families and explain their importance; and

(B) retell stories from selected folktales and legends. (even local ones)

(16) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how technology has affected daily life, past and present. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how household tools and appliances have changed the ways families live;

(B) describe how technology has changed communication, transportation, and recreation; and

(C) describe how technology has changed the way people work.

(17) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) obtain information about a topic using a variety of oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music;

(B) obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as pictures, graphics, television, maps, computer images, literature, and artifacts;

(C) sequence and categorize information; and

(D) identify main ideas from oral, visual, and print sources.

(18) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences; and

(B) create visual and written material including pictures, maps, timelines, and graphs.

(19) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.4. Social Studies, Grade 2.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 2, students focus on a study of their local community by examining the impact of significant individuals and events on the history of the community as well as on the state and nation. Students begin to develop the concepts of time and chronology by measuring calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years. The relationship between the physical environment and human activities is introduced as are the concepts of consumers and producers. Students identify functions of government as well as services provided by the local government. Students continue to acquire knowledge of important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent national beliefs and principles. Students identify the significance of works of art in the local community and explain how technological innovations have changed transportation and communication. Students communicate what they have learned in written, oral, and visual forms.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales, myths, and legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Selections may include the legend of the bluebonnet. Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands the historical significance of landmarks and celebrations in the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the significance of various community, state, and national celebrations;

(B) identify and explain the significance of various community, state, and national landmarks such as the county courthouse and state and national capitol buildings.

(2) History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as ancient times and modern times;

(B) use vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future;

(C) create and interpret timelines; and

(D) describe and measure calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years.

(3) History. The student understands how various sources provide information about the past. The student is expected to:

(A) name several sources of information about a given period or event; and

(B) compare various interpretations of the same time period using evidence such as photographs and interviews.

(4) History. The student understands how historical figures and ordinary people helped to shape our community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify contributions of historical figures who have influenced the community, state, and nation;

(B) identify historic figures who have exhibited a love of individualism and inventiveness; and

(C) explain how local people and events have influenced local community history.

(5) Geography. The student uses simple geographic tools such as maps, globes, and photographs. The student is expected to:

(A) use symbols, find locations, and determine directions on maps and globes; and

(B) draw maps to show places and routes.

(6) Geography. The student understands the locations and characteristics of places and regions. The student is expected to:

(A) identify major landforms and bodies of water, including continents and oceans, on maps and globes;

(B) locate the community, nation, the nation, and selected countries on maps and globes; and

(C) compare information from different sources about places and regions.

(7) Geography. The student understands how physical characteristics of places and regions affect people's activities and settlement patterns. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how weather patterns, natural resources, seasonal patterns, and natural hazards affect activities and settlement patterns; and

(B) explain how people depend on the physical environment and its natural resources to satisfy their basic needs.

(8) Geography. The student understands how humans use and modify the physical environment. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways in which people depend on the physical environment, including natural resources, to meet basic needs;

(B) identify ways in which people have modified the physical environment such as building roads, clearing land for urban development, and mining coal;

(C) identify consequences of human modification of the physical environment such as the use of irrigation to improve crop yields; and

(D) identify ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources.

(9) Economics. The student understands the importance of work. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how work provides income to purchase goods and services; and

(B) explain the choices people in the free enterprise system can make about earning, spending, and saving money, and where to live and work.

(10) Economics. The student understands the roles of producers and consumers in the production of goods and services. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between producing and consuming;

(B) identify ways in which people are both producers and consumers; and

(C) trace the development of a product from a natural resource to a finished product.

(11) Government. The student understands the purpose of governments. The student is expected to:

(A) identify functions of governments;

(B) identify some governmental services in the community such as libraries, schools, and parks and explain their value to the community; and

(C) describe how governments establish order, provide security, and manage conflict.

(12) Government. The student understands the role of public officials. The student is expected to:

(A) compare the roles of public officials including mayor, governor, and president; and

(B) identify ways that public officials are selected, including election and appointment to office.

(13) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary people. The student is expected to:

(A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good;

(B) identify historic figures who have exemplified good citizenship; and

(C) identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.

(14) Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent national beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an national love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.

(15) Culture. The student understands the significance of works of art in the local community. The student is expected to:

(A) identify selected stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of the local cultural heritage; and

(B) explain the significance of selected stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of the local cultural heritage.

(16) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how science and technology have affected life, past and present. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how science and technology have changed communication, transportation, and recreation; and

(B) explain how science and technology have changed the ways in which people meet basic needs.

(17) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) obtain information about a topic using a variety of oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music;

(B) obtain information about a topic using a variety of visual sources such as pictures, graphics, television, maps, computer software, literature, reference sources, and artifacts;

(C) use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword computer searches, to locate information;

(D) sequence and categorize information; and

(E) interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, predicting, and comparing and contrasting.

(18) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences; and

(B) create written and visual material such as stories, poems, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas.

(19) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.5. Social Studies, Grade 3.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 3, students learn how individuals have changed their communities and world. Students study the effects inspiring heroes have had on communities, past and present. Students learn about the lives of heroic men and women who made important choices, overcame obstacles, sacrificed for the betterment of others, and embarked on journeys that resulted in new ideas, new inventions, and new communities. Students expand their knowledge through the identification and study of people who made a difference, influenced public policy and decision making, and participated in resolving issues that are important to all people. Throughout Grade 3, students develop an understanding of the economic, cultural, and scientific contributions made by individuals.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales, myths, and legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time;

(B) identify individuals who have helped to shape communities;

(2) History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present. The student is expected to:

(A) identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, law, and material well-being; and

(B) compare ways in which people in the local community and communities around the world meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation, over time and in the present.

(3) History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:

(A) use vocabulary related to chronology, including ancient and modern times and past, present, and future times;

(B) create and interpret timelines; and

(C) describe historical times in terms of years, decades, and centuries.

(4) Geography. The student understands how humans adapt to variations in the physical environment. The student is expected to:

(A) describe and explain variations in the physical environment including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards;

(B) compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment;

(C) describe the effects of physical and human processes in shaping the landscape; and

(D) identify and compare the human characteristics of selected regions.

(5) Geography. The student understands the concepts of location, distance, and direction on maps and globes. The student is expected to:

(A) use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places . on maps and globes;

(B) use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes;

(C) identify and use the compass rose, grid, and symbols to locate places on maps and globes; and

(D) draw maps of places and regions that contain map elements including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system.

(6) Economics. The student understands the purposes of spending and saving money. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways of earning, spending, and saving money; and

(B) analyze a simple budget that allocates money for spending and saving.

(7) Economics. The student understands the concept of an economic system. The student is expected to:

(A) define and identify examples of scarcity;

(B) explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;

(C) explain the impact of scarcity on interdependence within and among communities; and

(D) explain the concept of a free market.

(8) Economics. The student understands how businesses operate in the national. free enterprise system. The student is expected to:

(A) give examples of how a simple business operates;

(B) explain how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service;

(C) explain how the cost of production and selling price affect profits; and

(D) identify historic figures and ordinary people in the community who have started new businesses.

(9) Government. The student understands the basic structure and functions of local government. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the basic structure of government in the local community;

(B) identify services commonly provided by local governments;

(C) identify local government officials and explain how they are chosen;

(D) explain how local government services are financed; and

(E) explain the importance of the consent of the governed to the functions of local government.

(10) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary people. The student is expected to:

(A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good;

(B) identify historic figures who have exemplified good citizenship;

(C) identify and explain the importance of acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws and voting; and

(D) identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.

(11) Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions;

(B) identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community; and

(C) identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations and explain how they serve the common good.

(12) Culture. The student understands ethnic and/or cultural celebrations. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the significance of selected ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in nation

(B) compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in nation, and other nations.

(13) Culture. The student understands the role of real and mythical heroes in shaping the culture of communities, the state, and the nation. The student is expected to:

(A) retell the heroic deeds of characters from national folktales and legends;

(B) retell the heroic deeds of characters of Greek and Roman myths; and



(14) Culture. The student understands the importance of writers and artists to the cultural heritage of communities. The student is expected to:

(A) identify selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage from communities around the world; and

(B) explain the significance of selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage to communities around the world.

(15) Science, technology, and society. The student understands how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in communities around the world, past and present. The student is expected to:

(A) identify scientists and inventors such as Louis Daguerre, Cyrus McCormick, Louis Pasteur, and Jonas Salk who have created or invented new technology; and

(B) identify the impact of new technology in photography, farm equipment, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on communities around the world.

(16) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) obtain information, including historical and geographic data about the community, using a variety of print, oral, visual, and computer sources;

(B) sequence and categorize information;

(C) interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting;

(D) use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword computer searches, to locate information;

(E) interpret and create visuals including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps; and

(F) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(17) Social studies skills. The student communicates effectively in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences;

(B) create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas; and

(C) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

(18) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.6. Social Studies, Grade 4.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 4, students examine the history of nation from the early beginnings to the present within the context of influences of the Western Hemisphere. Historical content focuses on nation history including the nation revolution, establishment of the Republic of nation, and subsequent annexation to the nation. Students discuss important issues, events, and individuals of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students conduct a thorough study of regions in nation and the Western Hemisphere that result from human activity and from physical features. . Students use critical-thinking skills to identify cause-and-effect relationships, compare and contrast, and make generalizations and predictions.

(2) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society.

(b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) History. The student understands the similarities and differences of Native-national groups in nation and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration. The student is expected to:

(A) identify Native-national groups in nation and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration and describe the regions in which they lived; and

(B) compare the ways of life of Native-national groups in nation and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration.

(2) History. The student understands the causes and effects of European exploration and colonization of nation and the Western Hemisphere. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize reasons for European exploration and settlement of nation and the Western Hemisphere;

(B) identify the accomplishments of significant explorers such as Cabeza de Vaca; Christopher Columbus; Francisco Coronado; and René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle and explain their impact on the settlement of nation;

(C) explain when, where, and why the Spanish established Catholic missions in nation;

(D) identify the accomplishments of significant empresarios including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, and Martín de León and explain their impact on the settlement of nation; and

(E) identify the impact of Mexico's independence from Spain on the events in nation.

(3) History. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the successes and problems of the Republic of nation;



(4) History. The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the impact of various issues and events on life in nation such as urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, and the growth of aerospace and other technology industries; and

(B) identify the accomplishments of notable individuals.

(6) Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:

(A) apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps; and

(B) translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.

(7) Geography. The student understands the concept of regions. The student is expected to:

(A) describe a variety of regions in nation and the Western Hemisphere such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity;

(B) describe a variety of regions in nation and the Western Hemisphere such as landform, climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics; and

(C) compare the regions of nation with regions of the nation and other parts of the world.

(8) Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:

(A) identify clusters of settlement in nation and explain their distribution;

(B) explain patterns of settlement at different time periods in nation;

(C) describe the location of cities in nation and explain their distribution, past and present; and

(D) explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in nation, past and present.

(9) Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in nation, past and present;

(B) identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in nation, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs; and

(C) analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in nation, past and present.

(10) Economics. The student understands the basic economic patterns of early societies in nation and the Western Hemisphere. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the economic patterns of various early Native-national groups in nation and the Western Hemisphere; and

(B) explain the economic patterns of early European immigrants to nation and the Western Hemisphere.

(11) Economics. The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in nation and the Western Hemisphere; and

(B) identify the economic motivations for Anglo-national colonization in nation.

(12) Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in nation. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the development of the free enterprise system in nation;

(B) describe how the free enterprise system works in nation; and

(C) give examples of the benefits of the free enterprise system in nation.

(13) Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in nation. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how people in different regions of nation earn their living, past and present;

(B) explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in nation;

(C) analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of nation;

(D) describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of nation;

(E) explain how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in nation; and

(F) explain the impact of national ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of nation.

(14) Economics. The student understands how nation, the nation, and other parts of the world are economically interdependent. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways in which technological changes have resulted in increased interdependence among nation, the nation, and the world;

(B) identify oil and gas, agricultural, and technological products of nation that are purchased to meet needs in the nation and around the world; and

(C) explain how Texans meet some of their needs through the purchase of products from the nation and the rest of the world.

(15) Government. The student understands how people organized governments in different ways during the early development of nation.

(16) Government. The student understands important ideas in historic documents of nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of state government.

(17) Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations of nation.

(18) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of voluntary individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels;

(B) explain the role of the individual in state and local elections;

(C) explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in state and local governments.

(19) Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in nation;

(B) identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various culture groups in nation; and

(C) summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the development of nation.

(21) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in nation. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have benefited individuals, businesses, and society in nation; and

(B) predict how future scientific discoveries and technological innovations might affect life in nation.

(22) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about the nation and nation;

(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(C) organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;

(D) identify different points of view about an issue or topic;

(E) identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event; and

(F) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(23) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;

(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;

(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;

(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and

(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

(24) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.7. Social Studies, Grade 5.

(a) Introduction.

(1) In Grade 5, students learn about the history of the nation from its early beginnings to the present with a focus on the 20th century. Students identify the contributions of famous inventors and scientists. Students use critical-thinking skills including sequencing, categorizing, and summarizing information and drawing inferences and conclusions.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Selections may include resources are also available from museums, historical sites, libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes with the history and geography strands establishing a sense of time and a sense of place. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills.

(b) Knowledge and skills.



(1) History. The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in the nation.

(2) Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:

(A) apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps; and

(B) translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.

(3) Geography. The student understands the concept of regions. The student is expected to:

(A) describe a variety of regions in the nation such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity;

(B) describe a variety of regions in the nation such as landform, climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics; and

(C) locate the fifty states on a map and identify regions such as New England and the Great Plains made up of various groups of states.

(4) Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the nation;

(B) describe clusters of settlement in the nation and explain their distribution;

(C) analyze the location of cities in the nation, including capital cities, and explain their distribution, past and present; and

(D) explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the nation, past and present.

(5) Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in the nation, past and present;

(B) identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the nation, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs; and

(C) analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in the nation, past and present.

(6) Economics. The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the nation; and

(B) identify major industries of colonial America.

(7) Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in the nation.

(8) Economics. The student understands the impact of supply and demand on consumers and producers in a free enterprise system. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how supply and demand affects consumers in the nation; and

(B) evaluate the effects of supply and demand on business, industry, and agriculture, including the plantation system, in the nation.

(9) Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in the nation. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze how people in different parts of the nation earn a living, past and present;

(B) identify and explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in the nation;

(C) analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of the nation;

(D) describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of the nation;

(E) analyze how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in the nation; and

(F) explain the impact of national ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of the nation.



(10) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how individuals can participate in civic affairs and political parties at the national level;

(B) analyze the role of the individual in national elections;

(C) explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in the national governments.

(11) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and compare leadership qualities of national leaders, past and present.



(12) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in the nation. The student is expected to:

(A) identify how scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as the transcontinental railroad, the discovery of oil, and the rapid growth of technology industries have advanced the economic development of the nation;

(C) explain how scientific discoveries and technological innovations in the fields of medicine, communication, and transportation have benefited individuals and society in the nation;

(D) analyze environmental changes brought about by scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as air conditioning and fertilizers; and

(E) predict how future scientific discoveries and technological innovations could affect life in the nation.

(25) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about the nation and nation;

(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(C) organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;

(D) identify different points of view about an issue or topic;

(E) identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event; and

(F) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(26) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;

(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;

(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;

(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and

(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

(27) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

 

Profile Information

Application afterLoad: 0.000 seconds, 0.38 MB
Application afterInitialise: 0.029 seconds, 2.23 MB
Application afterRoute: 0.033 seconds, 2.65 MB
Application afterDispatch: 0.064 seconds, 5.15 MB
Application afterRender: 0.066 seconds, 5.31 MB

Memory Usage

5586040

9 queries logged

  1. DELETE
      FROM jos_session
      WHERE ( time < '1510984854' )
  2. SELECT *
      FROM jos_session
      WHERE session_id = '408ec78a5b54802b7850ef597e665b83'
  3. INSERT INTO jos_session ( `session_id`,`time`,`username`,`gid`,`guest`,`client_id` )
      VALUES ( '408ec78a5b54802b7850ef597e665b83','1510985754','','0','1','0' )
  4. SELECT *
      FROM jos_components
      WHERE parent = 0
  5. SELECT folder AS type, element AS name, params
      FROM jos_plugins
      WHERE published >= 1
      AND access <= 0
      ORDER BY ordering
  6. SELECT m.*, c.`option` AS component
      FROM jos_menu AS m
      LEFT JOIN jos_components AS c
      ON m.componentid = c.id
      WHERE m.published = 1
      ORDER BY m.sublevel, m.parent, m.ordering
  7. SELECT template
      FROM jos_templates_menu
      WHERE client_id = 0
      AND (menuid = 0 OR menuid = 82)
      ORDER BY menuid DESC
      LIMIT 0, 1
  8. SELECT a.*, u.name AS author, u.usertype, cc.title AS category, s.title AS section, CASE WHEN CHAR_LENGTH(a.alias) THEN CONCAT_WS(":", a.id, a.alias) ELSE a.id END AS slug, CASE WHEN CHAR_LENGTH(cc.alias) THEN CONCAT_WS(":", cc.id, cc.alias) ELSE cc.id END AS catslug, g.name AS groups, s.published AS sec_pub, cc.published AS cat_pub, s.access AS sec_access, cc.access AS cat_access 
      FROM jos_content AS a
      LEFT JOIN jos_categories AS cc
      ON cc.id = a.catid
      LEFT JOIN jos_sections AS s
      ON s.id = cc.section
      AND s.scope = "content"
      LEFT JOIN jos_users AS u
      ON u.id = a.created_by
      LEFT JOIN jos_groups AS g
      ON a.access = g.id
      WHERE a.id = 66
      AND a.access <= 0
      AND (  ( a.created_by = 0 )    OR  ( a.state = 1 OR a.state = -1)
      AND ( a.publish_up = '0000-00-00 00:00:00' OR a.publish_up <= '2017-11-18 06:15:54' )
      AND ( a.publish_down = '0000-00-00 00:00:00' OR a.publish_down >= '2017-11-18 06:15:54' ) )
  9. UPDATE jos_content
      SET hits = ( hits + 1 )
      WHERE id='66'

Language Files Loaded

Untranslated strings

None